Pan-Seared Trout with Old Bay Remoulade

5 from 2 votes
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Pan-Seared Trout with Old Bay Remoulade, charred lemon, and herbs. This steelhead trout recipe is ready in under 30 minutes and makes a restaurant-worthy dinner.

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Pan-seared trout arranged on a blue and white platter topped with Old Bay Remoulade and herbs.

This recipe post is proudly sponsored by Seafood from Norway. All opinions are my own.

Read more: Pan-Seared Trout with Old Bay Remoulade

Why You’ll Love this Steelhead Trout Recipe

Succulent pan-seared fish, tangy spiced sauce, zippy lemon, and a smattering a fresh herbs: this meal checks all of the boxes.

Right at the intersection of hearty and healthy, this pan-seared trout is impressive enough for company, yet easy enough for weeknights.

If you’re not familiar with steelhead trout, you can prepare it similarly to salmon. It has a vibrant color, melt-in-your-mouth texture, and indulgent taste.

Steelhead trout is also full of key nutrients like protein, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamin D.

I’m using steelhead trout from Norway, who are leading the charge in sustainable farming practices.

Steelhead trout from Norway are raised in the waters of cold clear Norwegian fjords, giving them a cleaner taste than river trout.

For more impressive fish dinner recipes, also check out this amazing Broiled Salmon, Thai Coconut Cod, and Miso Ginger Salmon.

A fork flaking a fish fillet on a platter to show texture.

The Ingredients

  • Steelhead Trout: Nutritious, versatile, and easy to cook, steelhead trout from Norway shines in this recipe. If steelhead trout is not available to you, look for salmon from Norway instead.
  • Mayo: I use avocado mayo for extra heart-healthy fats.
  • Lemon: You need 3 whole lemons for this recipe. Two are charred for garnish, and the other is zested and juiced for the sauce. Charring lemons makes them sweeter, less acidic, and brighter in flavor.
  • Capers: For a salty, briny punch.
  • Pickles: Look for Bread & Butter pickle chips, which are delightfully sweet, crisp, and tangy.
  • Old Bay: This seasoning mix is a blend of celery salt, spices and paprika, which pairs especially well with seafood.
  • Herbs: I love using a mix of fresh parsley and dill. This pan-seared trout definitely benefits from the freshness of herbs.

For a complete list of recipe ingredients and quantities, see the recipe card below.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Step 1: Prepare Old Bay Remoulade

Combine all remoulade ingredients in a medium bowl; mix well to combine. Set aside.

Old Bay Remoulade being mixed in a gold bowl.

Step 2: Prepare Fish

Pat the steelhead trout dry with a paper towel, and generously season flesh and skin with salt and black pepper.

Step 3: Char Lemons

Cut the lemons in half crosswise, and brush flesh with oil. Place in a cast iron skillet over medium-high and cook, undisturbed, until nicely charred, about 4 to 5 minutes.

Step 4: Cook Fish

Reduce heat to low, and add oil to pan. Arrange fish, skin side-down, and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, undisturbed.

Carefully flip, and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes, until cooked through.

Steelhead trout fillets being seasoned and seared in a cast iron skillet.

Step 5: Assemble

Spread half of the Old Bay Remoulade on a serving platter, and top with fish fillets. Spoon remaining sauce overtop, and garnish with fresh herbs. Serve alongside lemons.

Serving Suggestions

I love serving this pan-seared trout with something fresh and vibrant. Here are a few suggestions:

Recipe FAQs

Is Steelhead Trout is a Good Fish to Eat?

Similarly to salmon, steelhead trout provides heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, as well as immune-supportive vitamin D, and selenium.
It’s also a fantastic source of protein, which helps keep you full longer.

Is Steelhead Trout very Fishy?

Steelhead trout is actually milder and less fatty than salmon, with less overtly “fishy” flavor. It’s a great gateway fish for those who don’t currently consume much seafood.

Can I Use Salmon Instead of Trout?

If steelhead trout is unavailable at your local grocery store, you can absolutely use salmon in this recipe. Look for salmon from Norway, which has a superior taste and texture compared to other farmed salmon.

Storage Tips:

  • Store: Store fish separately from remoulade. The fish will last up to 2 days in the refrigerator, while any leftover remoulade will last up to 1 week.
  • Reheat: Rewarm trout in a skillet over medium-low heat, covered, to help the fish steam. Add remoulade and herbs after it is warm.
Pan-seared steelhead trout fillets arranged on a blue and white platter with dollops of remoulade, charred lemon halves, and herbs.

More Healthy Fish Dinner Recipes:

If you give this steelhead trout recipe a try, be sure to snap a picture and tag #dishingouthealth on Instagram so I can see your beautiful creations. Also, follow along on Facebook and Pinterest for the latest recipe updates!

5 from 2 votes

Pan-Seared Trout with Old Bay Remoulade

Pan-Seared Trout with Old Bay Remoulade, charred lemon, and herbs. This Steelhead trout recipe is ready in under 30 minutes and makes a restaurant-worthy dinner.
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 4

Equipment

  • Large skillet
  • Mixing bowl

Ingredients  

  • 3 whole lemons, divided
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise (I use avocado oil mayo)
  • 3 Tbsp. minced Bread & Butter pickle chips
  • 1 Tbsp. minced capers
  • 1 tsp. Old Bay seasoning
  • Dash of hot sauce (I like Tabasco)
  • 4 (6-oz.) skin-on steelhead trout fillets (preferably steelhead trout OR salmon from Norway)
  • 3/4 tsp. kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp. cracked black pepper
  • 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Fresh torn parsley leaves and fresh dill for garnish
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Instructions 

  • Prepare Old Bay Remoulade by combining mayonnaise, pickles, the zest and juice of 1 whole lemon, capers, Old Bay, and hot sauce in a bowl; mix well. Set aside.
    Prepare trout by patting fish dry with a paper towel, and seasoning the flesh and skin with salt and black pepper.
  • Slice the remaining two lemons in half crosswise. Brush flesh of lemons with olive oil. Heat a large cast iron or stainless steel pan over medium-high. Once hot, arrange lemons, cut side down, and cook undisturbed, until lightly charred, about 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer lemons to a plate.
  • Add remaining 2 Tbsp. oil to the pan, and reduce heat to medium. Arrange trout fillets, skin side down, in pan. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, undisturbed, until the skin starts to crisp. Gently flip, and cook for 3 to 4 additional minutes, until cooked through.
  • To serve, spread half of Old Bay Remoulade on a serving platter. Arrange trout fillets overtop, and spoon remaining remoulade overtop. Garnish with fresh herbs, and serve with charred lemons. (The juice of each lemon half can be squeezed over each fillet.)

Notes

  • Store: Store fish separately from remoulade. The fish will last up to 2 days in the refrigerator, while any leftover remoulade will last up to 1 week.
  • Reheat: Rewarm trout in a skillet over medium-low heat, covered, to help the fish steam. Add remoulade and herbs after it is warm.

Nutrition

Serving: 1trout fillet with 3 T. sauce | Calories: 458kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 36g | Fat: 28g | Saturated Fat: 3.75g | Sodium: 860mg | Sugar: 2g

I calculate these values by hand to ensure accuracy, however expect up to a 10% variable depending on food brands.

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1 Comment

  1. Kyle says:

    5 stars
    This was the best homemade dish I have ever eaten. I want to use this remoulade in so many ways. I can’t stop thinking about it.